Sunday, 17 August 2014

Road to Rebellion by George Hamilton

This is an epic tale of the Morley family owning and living on a sugar cane plantation in 18th century Jamaica.

The story starts when Charles is a young man and falls in love with Catalina a slave girl.  His father is not happy and sends him off to London to find a wife, which he does.  He has a child by both his wife and his love, but obviously there are complications and so the family story weaves along the years.

I really enjoyed this sprawling story.  I learned a bit of history, although I preferred the family saga part of this tale, rather than the historical warring parts.

As with the other books by this author, we get to see how the poor live in a time and part of the world we'd not want to imagine.  However, this story is not sad or depressing, just a good tale.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00MR2H84K/?tag=jookuf-21


Santa Clause Lies and Murder by Sibel Hodge

Amber Fox is back and I'm happy to read a new story, even if it is just a shorter filler.
It is Christmas Eve and St Nicholas' bones have been stolen from a small local museum.

Having read and enjoyed the first four Amber stories, I immediately felt at home in the story.  In saying that, I'm sure it works fine as a stand-alone, with just a few references to back story.

As this is a chick-lit mystery, you know how things will pan out, but it's all about the journey and this was an interesting, fun whodunnit.

Sibel Hodge has branched out into other genres recently, but I like this genre by her the best.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00MH5LN16/?tag=jookuf-21


Saturday, 26 July 2014

Maybe, Misery by C.S. Bailey

I wasn't quite sure what this book was about before I started and it starts off quietly enough.  Talon is a man who wants to cure cancer but ends up, well certainly NOT curing anything.

The story is non-linear.  We go back and forth to particular points in Talon's life, told in the first person, as a diary. It took me a bit of reading to get the hang of this, but once I actually paid attention to the dates at the top of chapters, I could follow it easily enough.  It felt as though Talon was speaking directly to me

I didn't really like Talon as a man.  Whilst he wanted to do good, he was a swearing sex addict, who didn't care about most women.  Once I got into the story, it was very addictive reading, fitting all the pieces together.

On the whole, an enjoyable, gripping bio-thriller.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00M27P7XE/?tag=jookuf-21


Thursday, 17 July 2014

One Dark Night by Anna Faversham

Lucy starts her life in early 19th Century Eastern England in a good home as her mother is a maid to a well-to-do family, but they have to leave to a life of poverty.  Well for Lucy anyway and her mother takes all the money she earns.  As she blossoms into late teenage, Lucy find herself the centre of attention of two eligible men who hate each other.

This tale of life in the times of smuggling depicts how hard it is to survive unless you get a chance.  Lucy needs to make a choice, but which should she choose.  As a reader I knew which one I wanted her to go with and at times was annoyed that nobody ever gave their true intentions.  But that seems to be the way it was in those days.  You could wait a few months before finding out the punchline of a joke.

I enjoyed this story even if I though Lucy was a bit child-like at times.  There was enough romance and smuggling action and drama to keep me interested and wanting to read on.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00LNQ24UY/?tag=jookuf-21


Wednesday, 16 July 2014

A Gathering of Ghosts by David Haynes

A Gathering of Ghosts is a collection of short stories.  David Haynes has moved from his macabre stories and delves into the world of ghost stories.  Again these stories are set in Victorian times and the author is clearly at home writing in this time.

I enjoyed the richness of each story.  They might have been short, but packed a lot of intrigue into them, always making me want to read on.

My favourite was The Silent Bell.  That brought my hackles up.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00LNHY7DU/?tag=jookuf-21


Sunday, 29 June 2014

Pines (Wayward Pines #1) by Blake Crouch

Ethan Burke arrives in the town of Wayward Pines but things aren't quite as they should be.  He tries to get out, to contact his family, to go home, but the town doesn't want him to leave.

I definitely found this to be un-put-downable as I read it in one day after a friend recommended the series.   I won't say it is high fiction, but it is definitely fast-paced and I wanted to know what happened next and next and next.  I agree with some reviewers where they say Burke should spend a bit of time resting as he seems to have super human recovery powers as he gets beat up and then keeps going with all his injuries.  Even I was feeling exhausted for him.

This has been compared to Twin Peaks, Lost, Walking Dead, but I didn't get those vibes.  I was imagining it more like (the TV series) setting of Under The Dome.  Being British, I only know "small town rural America settings" from TV series, but the town was quite fleshed out in this story.

In summary, I enjoyed this, even with its flaws and will read book 2 after having a rest.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B007FG9LIE/?tag=jookuf-21


Murder in the Midi by Cecilia Peartree

I adore Cecilia Peartree's Pitkirtly mysteries and the author herself had said this early story is "not a Pitkirtly", so it languished on my Kindle as I didn't want to be disappointed.

However I was happy to not be disappointed.  This is a reasonably story with a bit of a whodunnit.  It is a light read, nothing too heavy.  

Whilst this is not Pitkirtly - the sun shines in this story - It is not a bad read.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B006GF28PS/?tag=jookuf-21



Without A Hitch by Andrew Price

Without a Hitch is almost two books for the price of one.  It's kind of like an episode of Law and Order where the first bit is the Law and the second is the Order.

Two colleagues who are bored in their jobs decide to commit the perfect crime - credit card theft.

The setting up of the "thefts" was enjoyable to read, although I must admit I kept getting the two characters mixed up at the start as it dragged a bit and they seemed much of a muchness.  As the book progressed, it was obvious which was which as their characters and what they wanted from this diverged.

I was rather taken by this story.  It was better than expected and I really enjoyed it.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/ebook/dp/B0088JF7EY/?tag=jookuf-21



Sunday, 8 June 2014

The No-Kids Club by Talli Roland

The No-Kids Club is thought up by Clare when she couldn't get a decent conversation with her friends without them going on and on about children.
The first two members to join have issues with the topic of children themselves which is why they need non-kid conversations.  The book then follows the lives of these three women as they find out what they really want in life.

I enjoyed reading about them avoiding kid-talk, but inevitably, as with the chick-lit canon, the more they don't talk about children, the more the topic of children comes up.

As with all of Talli Roland's books, you get a great easy to read story with reasonably happy endings, although the endings may not be what you expect from the start.

This is not my favourite of the author's books, probably because the subject matter didn't really interest me, but in saying that, I always get a great quality interesting read from this author and will always read one of her books.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00H8AP1VI/?tag=jookuf-21


Sunday, 1 June 2014

Interrogating Tim Arnot

Meet Tim Arnot.  You'll find him hanging out after the apocalypse.



How do you strike the balance between writing something you want to write and writing something that people want to read, in terms of the compromises you make, if any?

I write what I want to read. I hope other people want to read the same kind of things. So far no one has complained because I killed off X, or Y didn’t get off with Z. I guess the only compromise I make is in terms of “maturity”. I pitch my writing at what might be termed a “15 Certificate” level, so that determines how much swearing there is (yes I have f-bombs, although not many), and what levels of violence, sex and nudity I allow myself.


What excites, attracts or appeals to you about the genre(s) you write in.

My stories are post-post-apocalyptic (is that a genre?). There was an apocalypse somewhere in the distant past, and presumably a post-apocalypse too, although it’s not important to the story. We’ve had lots of apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic fiction that deals with the immediate aftermath (Terry Nation’s Survivors on TV in the 70s was probably my introduction to the genre, and consequently a big influence), but I think it’s much more interesting to look at what has happened to society, say, 100 years down the road.


Do you have a box, drawer, folder etc where you keep thoughts and ideas for future stories? Such as names you have come across, bits of dialogue, ideas, characters - even if you have no idea when you might use them?

I have an A5 sized notebook for every project, that works kind of like the rough books we had in school. So I try to do all my planning etc. in that. It does capture many plot bunnies, but there are lots more that crop up while I’m driving, or in the bath, out shopping etc., and that relies on me remembering them until I can scrawl them down on the back of a napkin, or get my phone out an email myself. Those bunnies do have a habit of getting lost.

One of the nice things about Scrivener (the program I use for writing) is that it has a “Research” folder, and that can capture web sites. So if I’m browsing – for the sake of argument – the difference between a brig-rigged sailing ship and a ship-rigged one (it’s the number of masts, btw ;)) I can easily save the web site for later reference.


How do you manage plot bunnies (ideas that invade your mind that aren’t usually helpful to the story you’re writing but breed like...er...bunnies)?

They go in the book, along with the rest. I tend to plan fairly well in advance – you need to when you’re writing a trilogy, because things that are going to happen in book 2 might need to be set up in book 1, and stuff for book 3 needs to be kicked off in book 2 – so they don’t distract me too much.

I never get rid of stuff I’ve written – even if I’ve “deleted” a 30,000 word sub-plot, because one day it might come in useful.


How much of you is in your characters? Which of your characters is the you that you’d most like to be? Or be with ?

Probably quite a lot, I dunno. I think it would take someone else to spot it, and it’s not something I really think about. Who would I like to be? Probably Socko. He started off as basically a simple cypher to deliver some evidence, but he really kicked off my imagination, and has now got his own spinoff series. In terms of who would I like to be with? That’d be telling, and anyway she wouldn’t be interested.


Do you become so wrapped up in your writing that your spouse wonders if they're married to you or one of your characters?

There’s a spouse? Anyone who’s seen the state of my house and garden would know that boat sailed long ago!


What type of book do you like reading? Is it the same genre as you write?

I love reading space opera. Big epic spaceship battles are definitely my thing. I did try to write one one year for NaNoWriMo, but it was awful. Truly awful. But I do read pretty widely – Post-Apoc and Dystopia of course, but also thrillers, fantasy, speculative fiction are my staples. I’ve recently discovered Urban Fantasy: Ben Aaronovitch – look him up if you haven’t read him. Utterly brilliant. I’m not so keen on out and out horror, and I run away screaming from historical romance.


What lengths do you go to to convince us readers that your book has the X factor?

Not enough, obviously. Like every author, I struggle to find the pot of gold whose name is visibility. It doesn’t matter how wonderful your words are, how many freebies you have, knickknacks or whatever, if nobody knows about it. In the end I decided it was probably more important to get on with writing the next book, and not worry about it too much.


How do you feel when a reader points out the spelling mistake(s) you have made?

I love it. Of course I strive for a perfect product from the get go, but we’re all human, and things do slip past  me, my editor and my beta readers. But because direct publishing through Kindle, Kobo etc. allows near-instant updates, we can fix issues pretty much as they arise (unlike traditional publishing, where any errors are fixed possibly forever).  I have a standing “thing” that anyone who emails me with an error that I subsequently fix, gets a part in the next book. There are several Characters in Hunted, for instance who are named after people that reported a typo in Wanted.


What do you like most about visiting KUF/GR/forums?

I’ve found a great bunch of people there, many of whom I now consider friends, and some of whom are now my beta readers. The GR UKAKF tends to have quite a low signal to noise ratio, but it’s a good place to let your hair down for a bit, and we’ve had a couple of meet ups, which was fun.


What is on your near horizon?

Hunted, my second novel is currently with beta readers, and is expected out in August. I’m starting to ramp up publicity for that. I’m currently writing the third Socko spinoff – “Socko’s First Fire” and the third part of the Flick Carter trilogy, tentatively titled “Defeated” plus another spinoff novella are in development.


Where can we find you for more information?

https://www.facebook.com/TimArnotAuthor is my Facebook page. @TimArnot is my twitter. My blog is http://www.tim-arnot.com but I admit to being rather lax at keeping it updated. I do have a mailing list for people interested in new releases, at http://eepurl.com/Bezk5 and I’d love more people to sign up for that. You can also spot me around the KUF GR and KBoards forums.

Saturday, 24 May 2014

FAG by Jonathan Hill

FAG is the story of life in an 1930s English boys boarding school.  It is an unsettling read of bullying, intolerance and non-acceptance.

I sort of knew what was going to happen and it wasn't pleasant reading.  This was a very well written book.  The pain of the characters came through and it was heartbreaking at times.  In writing this review, all I can think of are clich├ęs, but that's because they are true. 

In saying that this is a harrowing story, it is a page turner.  As things spiral downwards, I needed to know what was going to happen next, with the hope that things would turn out OK.

This author is known for his light-hearted Maureen series of books and this one is a lifetime away from them.  I will be thinking of this book for some time.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00KJ5XXOG/?tag=jookuf-21


Friday, 16 May 2014

Interrogating Katherine Roberts

Katherine Roberts is the author of children's fantasy stories.


How do you strike the balance between writing something you want to write and writing something that people want to read, in terms of the compromises you make, if any?

I always hope there will be at least some people who want to read what I want to write, because I’m not sure I could write fiction that didn’t excite me in some way. (Non-fiction, maybe, but then only if someone was paying me to do it, and that’s a different thing.) But I think publishing is always a bit of a compromise, especially if you write for younger readers – in my children’s books, for example, I take out adult material, use younger characters and simplify the prose. I try to end up with a book that might have excited me as a child.


What excites, attracts or appeals to you about the genre(s) you write in?

I love the world-building in fantasy, and I read/write to escape from the ‘real’ world so ancient history or science fiction works for me, too.


Do you have a box, drawer, folder etc where you keep thoughts and ideas for future stories? Such as names you have come across, bits of dialogue, ideas, characters - even if you have no idea when you might use them?

Oh yes! I have a notebook stuffed with ideas and clippings etc, also a box full of paper files containing research, ideas and character notes for books and series in various stages of completion. I have a few folders on my computer, too, where I’ve started writing actual chapters.


How do you manage plot bunnies (ideas that invade your mind that aren’t usually helpful to the story you’re writing but breed like...er...bunnies)?

They probably belong to another story, so I’ll banish them to one of the files mentioned above. I usually have a plot outline for the book I’m writing, so the bunnies tend to respect that but breed like wildfire when I’m between books… that’s when they become a problem! There are so many of them, I don’t know which book to write next and end up rushing around in circles tripping over the things.


How much of you is in your characters? Which of your characters is the you that you’d most like to be? Or be with ?

I think there was more of me in my earlier books – I’m a bit of a worrier and a wimp, so the girls came under fire (from American reviewers, particularly) for not being feisty enough. My latest series however has a sword-brandishing, flame-haired warrior princess who rides a white horse, has a fairy prince as a friend, and is heiress to the throne of England. Her name’s Rhianna Pendragon and she’s a bit younger than me, obviously, but that’s my fantasy character!


Do you become so wrapped up in your writing that your spouse wonders if they're married to you or one of your characters?

Er, yes. We divorced because of that – it actually says so on the Decree Nisi.


What type of book do you like reading? Is it the same genre as you write?

Same genre – fantasy/SF/historical fantasy – but for older readers. However, I do enjoy good YA (such as The Hunger Games), and I sometimes write that kind of thing too so there’s an overlap.


What lengths do you go to to convince us readers that your book has the X factor?

I am not sure an author (or publisher or PR team) can ever convince readers of that – the X Factor is something readers decide upon, and no amount of telling them is going to change what they think! I settle for gently reminding people my book exists, and after that hopefully readers will take over.


How do you feel when a reader points out the spelling mistake(s) you have made?

Nobody has ever done this… though there’s always a first time. As far as my backlist goes, I should hope that after the professional editing process and several proofreads at my publishers there aren’t any mistakes, but typos do occasionally creep through. I have heard of cases where a small error on the cover means an entire print run being recalled from the shops and pulped, so it can be an expensive mistake to make! With an ebook, though, any errors are easy to fix, so no excuses really. (And now I shall have to proofread this interview with a fine-toothed comb… how many did you spot?)


What do you like most about visiting KUF/GR/forums?

KUF is a really friendly place to visit, and I have it bookmarked on my computer. By GR, do you mean Goodreads? I just keep my book list and author page updated there, and occasionally review books I’ve read rather than take part in the forums. I see that as a place for readers, really, so when I go there I have my reader hat on.


What is on your near horizon?

I am trying to decide which book to write next, so all those plot bunnies are still racing around… and still breeding, help!… but I do have a finished YA about Genghis Khan that I am thinking of self-publishing this summer. I’m also going to be a Royal Literary Fund Fellow this autumn, which will be interesting.


Where can we find you for more information?

Twitter: @AuthorKatherine

FREE ebook: Horse of Mist - a short prequel to the Pendragon Legacy series for young readers, introducing Rhianna Pendragon.

Sunday, 4 May 2014

Angel of Rosetown by Jennifer Hanning

This is a story of many parts.  It starts off with Molly and Abel finding themselves to be true soul mates, but life for Molly is short.  Except life for Molly is actually many lifetimes as she ascends to Harmonia and has to wait for Abel to join her.  Abel takes a bit longer than Molly would like and this book tells their many tales.

This is promoted as a spiritual story, but I just found it a very well told tale.  Yes, Molly is a spirit for most of the story and it's a bit about good and evil, however it's not in your face and is basically just a love story albeit where they are not together very much.  

This story is a very light, easy to read one and I enjoyed reading different tales of life through the ages across the world.  It was quite a long story, but because it flitted across different lives, it didn't drag.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B0072Z5FGK/?tag=jookuf-21



Sunday, 27 April 2014

The Time Hunters and The Sword of Ages by Carl Ashmore

The Sword of Ages is the fourth instalment in The Time Hunters series.  This time Becky, Joe and Uncle Percy are on the trail of a sword in medieval England.

The best thing about the whole series of stories is that young readers are never spoken down to or the story dumbed down, and older readers can pick up on references younger ones might not.

As the young characters get older, the stories get a little more "grown up".  This one is quite dark and scary at times.  The evil characters are more evil and the youngsters have to deal with more.  None of this takes away from the fact that this is a romping great tale.  We find out more about the other characters, especially Will's back story.

I do think that this is the best of the lot so far.  I also think it could be read on its own, but it is far far better to have followed the stories.  I really like Becky and Joe's relationship where they are always calling each other names, but are always fiercely protective of each other.

The only negative thing about this book is that it finishes.  I'm always left wanting more.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00JNU0WGA/?tag=jookuf-21




Interrogating Katie Stewart

Katie Stewart not only writes imaginative books, but also designs magical covers



How do you strike the balance between writing something you want to write and writing something that people want to read, in terms of the compromises you make, if any?

I don’t know whether I should admit it, but I don’t really think about what other people might want to read when I’m writing. I get an idea in my head for a story and I just write it – the way I would like to read it. I think if I was constantly concentrating on what others might think of what I’m writing, then it would become stilted, not really my story at all. I don’t think I could ever write a book simply because I think it’s what other people would like to read.


What excites, attracts or appeals to you about the genre(s) you write in.

In a word – imagination. I know that authors who write in any genre have to use their imaginations, but fantasy goes beyond any other sort of writing. You get to take what is, twist it around and make what may be. You can create whole new worlds with whole new social systems, customs and religions and still say something about this world that we’re in now. I always loved the idea of magic, too, the idea that things around us can produce a power to do something.  Music, for instance. Listen to music, shut your eyes and you’re transported to somewhere else. It can change your emotions, your outlook. If you let it happen. What’s that if it’s not magic?


Do you have a box, drawer, folder etc where you keep thoughts and ideas for future stories? Such as names you have come across, bits of dialogue, ideas, characters - even if you have no idea when you might use them?

No, I’m afraid not. I keep my ideas in a sieve called my brain. I probably should keep a notebook. Heaven knows I have enough notebooks around the house, but generally I don’t, though since I got an iPad, I have been known to tap in the odd note or two. There are also a few slips of paper around the place with rough maps on that I’ve used to help me get a new world into my head, but nothing organised. I’m a terribly disorganised person really.


How do you manage plot bunnies (ideas that invade your mind that aren’t usually helpful to the story you’re writing but breed like...er...bunnies)?

I keep them in the sieve I just mentioned. Usually though, I feed them for a while until they’re solid enough not to fall through the holes. Then they just sit there until I have time to do something with them. I have been known to have two or three stories on the go at the same time, though. That means that some of the bunnies have grown very big and are stomping their big feet demanding attention all at once.


How much of you is in your characters? Which of your characters is the you that you’d most like to be? Or be with ?

When I first read this question, my first response was, ‘well of course not, most of my main characters are men’, but although I don’t consciously put myself into my characters, I don’t think you can write without putting something of yourself into it. So yes, there must be some of me in my characters. However, I don’t think there’s any one character that’s even close to ‘me’. They’re a hotchpotch of lots of different people.

As for a character I’d most like to be, I don’t think I’d want to be any of them. I do terrible things to my characters all the time. I’d hate it if anyone did those things to me.


Do you become so wrapped up in your writing that your spouse wonders if they're married to you or one of your characters?

I have a part-time job as well as doing book cover design, so I don’t have the luxury of getting wrapped up in my writing. It’s a do-it-when-you-can sort of thing. I also have a family who cannot seem to get the idea that writing is a job and I’m not to be disturbed. So unless I ‘chuck a wobbly’, I will get a head popping around the door every five minutes wanting to know when tea will be ready or if I know where something is. When I’m doing the final draft of a book, I am likely to chuck a wobbly and lay down the law more often, but the rest of the time, I’ve learned to switch in and out of writerly mode at will.


What type of book do you like reading? Is it the same genre as you write?

I like reading any type of book as long as it’s a good one, but I prefer books that are character driven, rather than plot driven. I firmly believe that an author should read a wide variety of genres to give them a better idea of writing in general. As a fantasy author it’s easy to pick up ideas from a book that’s not fantasy and turn it around to be fantasy. One of my books first popped into my head when I was reading Les Miserables (my favourite book, by the way – full of fantastic characterisation). I think if you stick to only one genre, you’re likely to get stuck in the tropes of that genre and find it hard to be original.


What lengths do you go to to convince us readers that your book has the X factor?

Ah, now, that’s something I’m not particularly good at. Not because I don’t think my books have the X factor, but because I was brought up to stand back and not be boastful. So standing up (so to speak) on the internet and singing the praises of my own books is something that feels really strange and wrong somehow. I do all the social networking like they suggest, but I still tend to be a bit of a wallflower.


How do you feel when a reader points out the spelling mistake(s) you have made?

I’m very grateful. I’ve read a few books (traditional and self-published) where the editing has been atrocious. I take pride in my work and I want it to be as good as it can be. So if someone wants to point out a mistake, I appreciate it and go and fix it.


What do you like most about visiting KUF/GR/forums?

The people I talk to KUF and GR are wonderful people – friendly, helpful, caring and funny. They’re a great way to let off steam when things are getting me down or to share good news with. There’s none of the arguing and posturing that you find on some forums. Furthermore, I suspect a lot of my book sales have come from/through them.


What is on your near horizon?

A lot of clean washing that needs ironing. Oh, you mean as a writer? At the moment, I’m working on a new book – another YA fantasy – but at the speed I’m writing, publication is not on the near horizon. I’m also trying to get some illustrations done so that I can send ‘The Dragon Box’ to print. I also want to send ‘Song of the Jikhoshi’ into print, too.


Where can we find you for more information?

I have a website – http://www.katiewstewart.com  , a blog at http://kates-scribbles.blogspot.com.au/ or I can be found on Facebook at  www.facebook.com/Treespeaker

Thursday, 24 April 2014

Death I've Found Your Sting by Richard Martinus

This is a silly story about the ludicrousness of office life.  Kind of.

Clive and Sam are mates, who met when they started working together.  But when they realise they don't remember much about life before the job, they come to the conclusion that they think they are dead in hell as hell is their working life.

If you work in an office you will feel their pain in dealing with bureaucracy.   I enjoyed this story and Clive and Sam's attempts to escape.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00BATXB6A/r?tag=jookuf-21



Look Behind You by Sibel Hodge

Look Behind You is a departure from the normal Sibel Hodge fare of sassy chick-lit.  This one is a psychological thriller that is much deeper and darker.  Chloe believes she's just escaped from being kidnapped, but everyone else thinks it's all in her mind.

I love this author's books and will read anything she writes without paying much attention to what it is.  So I started reading this one without knowing anything about it.  I didn't like the first chapter.  It was way too creepy for me, but it had me gripped.  I honestly couldn't put it down.

We found out things as Chloe did as she'd lost her memory, so we were piecing things together as the story unfolded.

This was a great story and I really enjoyed this new direction Sibel Hodge has taken and hope there's more like this.  

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00JPFB11S/?tag=jookuf-21


Monday, 24 March 2014

A Darker Shade of Black by Ken Magee

Madrick, Tung and Michael, two wizards and one computer wizard, are back for the third part of the trilogy.

As soon as I settled down to read this story, I was engrossed with the story again.  These are great, funny characters.

As the characters were split up at the start, each person's story was told separately.  Some books would have swapped back and fore, a bit at a time, but this one was told in nice big chunks, which was satisfying to read.

I've really enjoyed the other stories in this trilogy and this one doesn't disappoint.  There are some wonderful new characters, some shocking moments and lots of laughs.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00J6CBQCE/?tag=jookuf-21


Monday, 10 March 2014

Pigeonwings by Heide Goody and Iain Grant

This is the sequel to the fantastic Clovenhoof, but this time Jeremy aka Clovenhoof, aka Satan is joined by the Archangel Michael.  Michael, being Mr Goody Two Shoes is easily led astray by Clovenhoof as he tries to adapt to living in Birmingham.

I thoroughly enjoyed the first book and, after a slowish start, this book develops into a great successor to it.  Again, the characters get into trouble with the fingers pointed firmly at Clovenhoof's door.  This was truly a laugh out loud book for me.  Looking at the desctiption, the book is over 400 pages.  I could have read 400 more about Clovenhoof.  He is a character that could run and run, and get into trouble wherever he goes.  There is great characterisation in all the main characters.

A thoroughly fun read.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00EGP9UNS/?tag=jookuf-21



Sunday, 9 March 2014

Bittersweet by Matthew Drzymala

Venetia comes across a photo of her grandfather and recalls his tales of the shop in the village of Bumpkinton he worked in when he was a young man.  She gets the idea that she wants to run the long forgotten shop and sets off to find it and get it.

This was a short but sweet tale.  We are introduced to characters of Bumpkinton and understand why Venetia wants to live there.  The story is very well written and I'm sure I could read more stories from this village.  

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00HFRRJ50/?tag=jookuf-21